The Kingdom Unified – From Samuel to Solomon (Journey the Word 6)

Hannah had no children, and cried out to the Lord to help her with her barrenness. The Lord granted her a child, and who was born was named Samuel. Now, Samuel heard God’s Call at a very young age.

Samuel, Saul, and David

1 Samuel 1-31; 1 Chronicles 1-10

Samuel led Israel as a prophet and the last judge of the era of Judges. People had begun to reject God as King, and demanded a king. But God warned the Israelites that unpleasant things would arise if a king were to rule. However, the people still insisted, so Samuel was to anoint a man named Saul to be Israel’s first king.

The Spirit of God came strongly upon Saul, as he was a man that could lead the kingdom well. However, he eventually disobeyed the Lord and ignored God; therefore, Samuel prophesied that the kingdom would not endure anymore for another man was to be chosen to take his place as king. David was the next man in line for the throne.

David was a shepherd, and a humble man who received the Spirit of the Lord once it departed from Saul. David quickly rose to prominence and power in Israel and defeated a giant Philistine warrior named Goliath. Saul and David warred each other, and Saul nearly killed David – so David fled Jerusalem.

David moved through the wilderness of Judah, and lived as a fugitive from Saul. David built a militia of 600 men strong. He raided different towns and lived with the Philistines for a while, which were the enemy of Israel. Soon, David, a shepherd boy, would become a man of war. Saul and his sons died in the battle against the Philistines, which allowed David to take the throne. God directed David to go to Hebron, and David obeyed.

King David

2 Samuel 1-24; 1 Chronicles 11-29; 1 Kings 1-2

In Hebron, David was made King of Judah, where he reigned for seven and a half years. The rest of the tribes made David king over all of Israel. His first act as King was to make Jerusalem the capital and bring the ark of the covenant into the city as well. When the ark entered Jerusalem, the sound of celebration could be heard! David would also write almost half of the 150 Psalms.

God blessed King David, giving him rest from enemies, and made a covenant with him. The Davidic Covenant would mean that the Kingdom would reign forever. Bringing national unity was something David had done that Saul could not do.

But King David did do something foolish, which was sleeping with Bathsheba, the wife of Uriah. David tried to conceal the fact that Bathsheba was pregnant, and had Uriah to die on the battlefield so that David could marry Bathsheba. God confronted David by Nathan the prophet, and David confessed his sin of abusing the flock of God. David prayed for mercy in Psalm 51. David received forgiveness from God, but there were consequences of this sin.

The series of troubles that occurred included one of his sons assaulting his daughter. Another son named Absalom attempted to usurp David’s throne and call himself king. Disloyal leaders in his kingdom attempted another coup. War between Israel and the Philistines would occur again, and a plague caused thousands in Israel to die. David would rule for forty years in Israel, and would allow his son Solomon to inherit the throne.

King Solomon

2 Chronicles 1-9; 1 Kings 3-11

Solomon reigned during a time of national prosperity and economic flourishing in Israel. Solomon began his kingship by asking God for wisdom. During his reign, he expanded the boundaries of Israel, and achieved many economic successes along with building the first temple in Jerusalem. The Ark of the Covenant would be placed in the Most Holy Place in the Temple.

Solomon’s wisdom was heavily recorded, and can be read in Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Song of Songs, and two Psalms (72 and 127). King Solomon married over 700 foreign wives and had 300 concubines. Not sure how wise that is, but definitely something to consider there. Royal marriages were usually a way of forming political and economic alliances between different nations to foster an era of trust. Solomon apparently desired to strengthen his kingdom by these marriages.

Incidentally, Solomon would fall into sin, by which he set up multiple places of worship for the gods of these many wives he had. Solomon’s heart would slowly turn toward these deities, and was no longer fully devoted to the Lord. During most of his reign though, Israel remained prosperous and unified. However, the kingdom was fragile and about to dissolve when Solomon would die.

Timelines of Events from Samuel to Solomon

  • 1100 BC – God gives Hannah a son named Samuel (1 Samuel 1).

  • Samuel heard God’s Call (1 Samuel 3).

  • The ark is captured temporarily by the Philistines. The High Priest Eli died (1 Samuel 4-6).

  • Samuel led Israel as a judge and prophet. Samuel and David were heroes of faith (Hebrews 11:32).

  • 1051 BC – Israel demands a King, so Samuel anointed Saul (1 Samuel 8-10).

  • Saul disobeyed God, so God rejected Saul as king (1 Samuel 13 and 15).

  • Samuel anointed a young shepherd named David to be the next King (1 Samuel 16). David was from Bethlehem and Jesus was born in Bethlehem… What a coincidence! (1 Samuel 16:1; Matthew 2:1).

  • David kills Goliath with a slingshot (1 Samuel 17).

  • David married Michal and befriended Jonathan (Saul’s son) (1 Samuel 18).

  • David spent 14 years as a fugitive after Saul tried to kill him (1 Samuel 19-30; Psalms 18, 56, 57, 59, 63, and 142).

  • Samuel died (1 Samuel 25:1) and David married Abigail (1 Samuel 25).

  • 1011 BC – Saul and Jonathan died in battle against the Philistines (1 Samuel 31; 1 Chronicles 10).

  • David is made king of Judah in Hebron and ruled for 7.5 years (2 Samuel 2).

  • David becomes king over all Israel and conquered Jerusalem (2 Samuel 5; 1 Chronicles 11).

  • David brought the ark to Jerusalem (2 Samuel 6; 1 Chronicles 13-16).

  • Davidic Covenant: God made a covenant with David (2 Samuel 7; 1 Chronicles 17).

  • David slept with Bathsheba and had Uriah killed so David could marry her (2 Samuel 11).

  • Nathan rebuked David, and David repented of his sin (2 Samuel 12; Psalm 51).

  • Absalom attempted a coup, but was killed in battle (2 Samuel 15-18; Psalm 3).

  • A plague occurred but then ceased, when David bought the threshing floor of Araunah and built his altar there (2 Samuel 24; 1 Chronicles 21).

  • Nathan and Bathsheba urge David to make Solomon the new king (1 Kings 1; 1 Chronicles 28).

  • 971 BC – David died after a 40 year reign (1 Kings 2; 1 Chronicles 29).

  • Solomon is made King and received wisdom from God (1 Kings 3; 2 Chronicles 1).

  • 960 BC – Solomon built the Temple in Jerusalem on the threshing floor of Araunah (1 Kings 5-8; 2 Chronicles 2-7; Psalm 30).

  • 950 BC – The Queen of Sheba visited Solomon and admired his wisdom and wealth (1 Kings 10; 2 Chronicles 9).

  • Solomon foolishly married many wives and worshiped their gods (1 Kings 11).

  • 931 BC – Solomon would die after his 40 year reign (1 Kings 11; 2 Chronicles 9).

The Promised Land: From Joshua to Judges (Journey the Word 5)

Joshua, one of the two spies with a good report about Canaan, challenged the Israelites to have courage, but the Israelites did not want to enter the Promised Land. About forty years later, Joshua stood on the outlying areas of the Promised Land, for God had given His People another chance at entering.

The Canaan conquest

Joshua 1-24

Joshua was Moses’ successor to lead the Israelites into Canaan. God promised to never leave him nor forsake him. God parted the Jordan river so the people could enter across dry land, which was similar to the Red Sea being parted for Moses and the Israelites as they left Egypt. The conquest for Canaan would begin with breaking down the walls of Jericho.

When Jericho fell, Rahab and her family were spared because of their faith and assistance to Israel. Soon, Joshua and his army would move through central Canaan. When they were near Shechem, which was between Mounts Ebal and Gerizim, Joshua and His People assembled to worship God. Joshua built an altar on Mount Ebal, and the priests presented offerings to the Lord while Joshua would read the Law of Moses. Reading the Law reminds people of the Mosaic Covenant.

Soon, Joshua would conquer cities in southern Canaan, and have many victories in the north as well. The Israelites quickly settled in Canaan, and different territories they were able to annex throughout the land to specific tribes of Israel. Lastly, Joshua would bid farewell as he died at age 110 and buried in the Promised Land.

The Time of the Judges

Judges 1-21

Since Joshua died, the tribes were without a central leader, and even though the Lord was their King, they needed someone to rule the people on the earth. Now, the book of Judges notes there was much sin and deliverance. To rule the people, Judges were needed over the tribes.

Idolatry was rampant during this time, as people believed in different deities that ruled over many facets of life. Especially prominent was Baal and Ashtaroth during this era. The Israelites turned to these other gods, instead of our One True God. Therefore, God sent oppression because of Israel’s sins. During their time of desperation, they cried out to God, and eventually God raised up a leader to deliver Israel from the oppression.

The most notable judges included Deborah, Gideon, and Samson. Deborah helped lead Israel to defeat King Jabin, Gideon led extraordinary military victories, and Samson helped accomplish God’s purpose of breaking the dominance of the Philistines over Israel.

With the success of each judge, Israel had experienced times of peace; however, Israel eventually went back to idolatrous ways, which caused more wars and oppression.

We see this cycle happen to Israel in the book of Judges, which occurs throughout human history interestingly:

Sin and disobedience => Oppression => Repentance => Deliverance => Peace (and it restarts after this).

List of Judges

#JudgeYearsCaptivity/Servitude
1Othniel40The children of Ammon and Amalek served Eglon for 18 years.
2Ehud18none
3ShamgarN/Anone
4DeborahAbout 40Shortly after the 40 years of peace after her reign, the Israelites were allowed to be oppressed by the Midianites, Amalekites, and children of the East. God chose Gideon to free the people and condemn their idolatry.
5Gideon40none
6Abimelech3none
7Tolah23none
8Jair22none
9Jephthah18none
10Ibzan7none
11Elon10none
12Abdon8none
13Samson20none

Ruth’s story

The book of Ruth seems to be set during the latter part of the judges’ reign. The story begins with a famine, which caused Naomi and family to move from Bethlehem to Moab. Naomi’s husband and two sons died in Moab. Naomi needed to return to Bethlehem, and therefore, Ruth joined her.

While in Bethlehem, Ruth worked among the poor, and obtained leftovers in grain fields. Boaz heard of Ruth’s unwavering dedication to Naomi, and had compassion for Ruth. By the end, Boaz married Ruth, which was neat to see God’s Love shining through this story.

Timelines of events during Joshua and Judges

  • 1406 BC – Joshua succeeds Moses as Israel’s leader (Joshua 1).

  • Israelites spy the Promised Land, Rahab hid them (Joshua 2). Rahab was a hero of faith and righteousness (Hebrews 11:31; James 2:25).

  • God parts the Jordan and lets the Israelites walk on dry land (Joshua 3-5).

  • Israelites march around Jericho for 7 days, and the walls fall down, and they conquer the city. Rahab and family are spared (Joshua 6).

  • Israel renews their covenant at Mounts Gerizim and Ebal (Joshua 8:30-35).

  • Gibeonites tricked Joshua into a peace treaty (Joshua 9).

  • Joshua divided the land among the Tribes of Israel (Joshua 13-22).

  • Israel renews the covenant and Joshua dies (Joshua 23-24).

  • 1300 BC – Israel forsook God. Soon, Othniel, Ehub, and Shamgar would be judges to lead Israel (Judges 1-3).

  • Deborah was a judge who partnered with Barak to defeat oppressors (Judges 4-5).

  • Gideon defeats the Midianites (Judges 6-8). Barak and Gideon are listed as heroes of faith (Hebrews 11:32).

  • 1200 BC – Tola, Jair, Jephthah, Ibzan, Elon, and Abdon lead Israel (Judges 10-12). Samson fought the Philistines with incredible strength (Judges 13-16). Jephthah and Samson are heroes of faith (Hebrews 11:32).

  • About 1100 BC – Idolatry, violence, and war happened among the Tribes of Israel (Judges 17-21). Ruth married Boaz and has a child that is the ancestor of King David (Ruth 1-4).

Samuel and Saul: To become the goodly judge for God (Book of 1 Samuel)

Before things start, Hannah comes before the Lord, as we see in Scripture, praying and grieving for a child – to which, she promises to dedicate to the Lord, if He shall bless her with a child. If she is to bear a child, her barrenness would be broken. Hannah became pregnant, then, with Elkanah, she bears Samuel – to which, she dedicates Samuel before the Lord when he’s weaned.

Hannah rejoices and sees the gift, so she praises the giver (God). She contemplates her blessings and looks unto the Lord for further provision. Hannah then speaks a prophecy about the coming Kingdom of God, that is Christ’s Kingdom – to which his enemies will be eradicated.

Israel is smitten before the Philistines, and sin was in the camp, which gave the enemies all they had wished for. They speak angrily of God, and hope to bring the ark into their camp. The Philistines grew afraid, because of “God being in the camp.”

Samuel’s sons were corrupt judges, and although Samuel did not take bribes, however, his sons did. His sons perverted judgment. Samuel was not pleased, and there was a plea for a king to judge, because it reflected upon God. He began praying, and then told them that they shall have a king, even though it wouldn’t bring pleasing results to the Lord.

12:24-25 explain to only fear the Lord, and serve Him in truth with all your heart, for He’s done great things. However, for those that do wickedly, it will consume them. In 13:11-14 shows that those who disobey the commandments of God do so foolishly for themselves, for sin is foolishness and the greatest of sinners are the greatest fools. God saw rebellion in the light of Saul, and therefore, unbelief and distrust was what the others had seen.

This chapter gives the understanding of the respect that was shown to David by Saul and Jonathan, as well as the servants of Saul, all the people, and in the songs of the women. The friendship of David and Jonathan was an example of grace, I believe, and brings the subject of love up. Those who love the Lord will be willing to join Him in covenant forever.

We see the power of God’s grace in David. David, with the harp in hand, aims to serve Saul. However, we see that Saul, with a javelin in hand, an attempt to slay David, but God’s grace appears to be for David, protecting him from harm. Saul tried to hurt David for so long, but we see God’s grace, in fact, is present, for David did not waver from his service to Saul. This caused Saul to begin to fear David, for it seems David was not much afraid of Saul.

The answer Eli gave to Samuel after the Lord’s visitation was as we see in 1 Samuel 3:18: “And he said, It is the LORD: let him do what seemeth him good.” The Israelites thought if they could just have the ark with them, they could win the war with the Philistines. When the news of the “capture” and the death of Eli’s sons came to him, he suffered a fall, which ended in death. The Ark was put upon a new cart and released with two cows/cattle to see where it would end up.

When Saul said that he had kept animals from the battle with the Amalekites to sacrifice, Samuel said, “obedience is better than sacrifice and to hearken than the fat of the rams.” Ishbaal (or Ish-bosheth) was the second king of Israel, who would replace Saul. He was one of Saul’s sons. We see the calling for one of his sons to be the next king in 16:1, and then in 2 Samuel toward the beginning, we see who it was after all.

Although Saul became very jealous and angry with David, he was forced to give his daughter Michal to David for his wife. David passed up a second chance to slay Saul, but instead he took his water cruse and spear while he slept.

Synopsis

The Book of First Samuel, one written by an unknown author, was done in the late tenth century BC. Originally, the two books of Samuel were one. The books outline the goings from judges to kings in Israel. Much of First Samuel deals with Samuel, Saul, and David, as well as the establishment of the monarchy.

The book begins with a story of Elkanah, who had two wives named, Peninnah and Hannah. Peninnah could have children, in whom Elkanah blessed the most, and Hannah could not have children. Hannah was enraged before God and cried before the Lord to try to compromise dedicating the child to Him, if she could have one. God answered and so she bore a son named Samuel, whom she dedicated before God.

Later, Hannah returned home to her husband, while Samuel stayed behind at Shiloh, where he was to be brought up by Eli (the priest) in the house of God. Eli had become the judge in Israel. His sons would carry out routine work involved with the sacrifices and other ceremonies. As we read on, we find that God is bringing up Samuel in a way to be Eli’s successor. Therefore, Samuel’s development, spiritually, was different from Eli’s sons. God sent a prophet later to Eli to announce a divine judgment upon their family. All of Eli’s descendants would be punished with poverty, shame, and early death.

In chapter three, as we move on, we find that God reveals to Samuel some information that was revealed to Eli through the prophet. Eli soon accepted God’s judgment as a just punishment. As the years had gone by, Samuel developed into a great leader, who was well known and respected in his land. Scripture declares that he was a prophet who taught God’s Will to people. He was appointed priestly duties by God, even though he wasn’t an Aaronic descendant. The priesthood was likely so corrupt that it wouldn’t matter who took the helm. People lost the meaning of rituals and ceremonies, so God was using prophets instead of priests to speak unto His People. The Holy Spirit revealed God’s Will to the prophets as they taught the people.

For many years, the Philistines oppressed Israel, but Samson began to save Israel from them. The Philistines became relentless and fought back, thus deciding to extend their rule further into Israel’s territory. The defeats of the Israelites were merely God’s punishment upon them, because of their sin. The Israelites were confused, so they started carrying the Ark of the Covenant on the battlefield, hoping God’s presence would accompany them. However, God showed that He was not currently supporting Israel, because the Philistines captured the Ark of the Covenant. However, later the Philistines returned the ark, because they felt it caused trouble for them.

Later, we see that during the Philistine oppression, Samuel took position as chief ruler in Israel. He was quite strict in his leadership about idolatry. He wanted all worship to be directed toward God. His influence increased over the various regions, as the Israelites continued their fight against the Philistines. As we read on in chapter 8, we see that the Israelite people ask for a king, because the history of Israel continued in the judges, but Samuel was no longer able to control the nation – being very old and also his sons were worthless.

The people began to turn from God and backslid. In search for stability within the nation of Israel, Samuel was asked to end the old system (of judges), and usher in the kingship. God then, revealed to Samuel that Saul was chosen to be Israel’s king. Saul would save Israel from the Philistines, so Samuel prepared Saul to receive the honor at a sacrificial feast. Saul would go from a farmer to a national leader. However, when the Spirit of God had come upon Saul, he began to behave in different ways, where people didn’t believe he was “king material.”

Later, Samuel had called a meeting for all of the leaders of the tribes and families in Israel – which was a counsel to select the king. A system of drawing lots was done so that only one man was finally chosen. Samuel and Saul both knew, as we see in Scripture, that Saul was the predestined one to take kingship over Israel. After the selection was made, Samuel announced publicly what the rights and duties were for a king. Saul, who had a mixed reputation amongst the people, brought shock or happiness upon the people it seems. Saul did not make any immediate changes to the administration, but rather just returned to his farm, which was in Gibeah. He then created the administrative center of Israel in Gibeah.

Soon, Saul led a victory against the Ammonites, becoming a national hero. Samuel had said farewell, before Saul prepared the fight against the Philistines. Israel’s regular army had two divisions, one under Saul’s command, and one under Saul’s son, Jonathan’s command. Saul was to go to Gilgal, where he had to wait for seven days for the arrival of Samuel. Once Israel’s leaders gathered the army, Samuel could then offer sacrifices to God on behalf of the nation, and then pass on God’s further instructions to Saul. However, an attack from the Philistines occurred, and Saul got impatient.

Therefore, he decided to offer the sacrifice himself, and Samuel saw that his action was rebellion against God. As punishment for him, God would remove him from the throne one day. Samuel and Saul then prepared for war against the Philistines and their men engaged in battle. After this, a war was led against the Amalekites, in which Saul’s obedience was tested. Again, he failed, and his kingly power was questioned. God then sent Samuel to tell Saul of the consequences of his disobedience, to which his rebellion was punishable as removal from power and replacement.

Saul’s replacement was David, who was brought to the royal court. Saul was not to know that David was anointed by Samuel to be the successor of him. God’s power came upon David and left Saul, and Saul had become unstable in his ways and jealous of David. However, soon, Saul became a permanent member of the royal court. Later, David was brought to the battle, and a champion had rose up named Goliath, whom no Israelite would dare (try) to defeat. David then killed Goliath, with no sword or spear, but with a sling and a stone.

After the defeat, David came to Saul’s court to live, and he and Jonathan became close friends, and then David serves Saul. After that, he marries Michal, before Saul fears David and became bitter against him. Saul has, three times, men to go and arrest him while he fled to Ramah. Soon, David was threatened by Saul, who came after him, but Saul was overcome by God’s Spirit and felt powerless. Jonathan, then, helped David escape, and Ahimelech the priest aided David. Saul discovered this, and this only created more animosity in Saul. Later, after Samuel was presumed dead, as we see in chapter 25, David married Abigail. (He lost Michal at an earlier time, when Saul took her and gave her to someone else.) David then went and found refuge in Philistia. A war broke out with the Philistines and the Israelites, and later Saul’s sons were killed and Saul himself was wounded as well. Saul then took his own life.

The Judges tried to overcome oppressors but sin got in the way

The main cause of Israel not having peace and prosperity was because of apostasy in the land. During the Book of Judges, Israel had 13 different judges to rule them and had 2 more in 1 Samuel. “In those days there was no king in Israel, but every man did that which was right in his own eyes.”  -Judges 17:6

The book covers about 450 years, covering the era between the death of Joshua and the Crowning of Saul. The main failure of Israel while dealing with the Canaanites was to press for a complete victory when they were strong; they put the Canaanites to tribute and did not utterly drive them out. God left the Canaanites, Hittites, Amorites, Perizzites, Hivites, Jebusites, and Philistines to teach Israel war and prove them. Also, so they would learn to obey the commandments of the Lord.

The Judges

#JudgeYearsCaptivity/Servitude
1Othniel40The children of Ammon and Amalek served Eglon for 18 years.
2Ehud18none
3ShamgarN/Anone
4DeborahAbout 40Shortly after the 40 years of peace after her reign, the Israelites were allowed to be oppressed by the Midianites, Amalekites, and children of the East. God chose Gideon to free the people and condemn their idolatry.
5Gideon40none
6Abimelech3none
7Tolah23none
8Jair22none
9Jephthah18none
10Ibzan7none
11Elon10none
12Abdon8none
13Samson20none

Synopsis

Judges, written by an unknown author or authors, was a big historical link between Joshua and the time of Israel’s kings. It was written somewhere around 1050-1000 BC. It deals with events in Israel during the two hundred years following Joshua’s conquest of Canaan. The Canaanites that still existed in Canaan were proved trouble for Israel, and therefore, deliverance needed to come.

Much of the events after Joshua’s death were detailed, as the author outlined Israel’s conquest of Canaan under Joshua. Firstly, the attack led by Judah and Simeon is summarized, as they took the Southern area. In bringing Israel into Canaan, God was indeed faithful to his covenant promises. However, the Israelites were not faithful to their promises, therefore, just as God used Israel to punish Canaan – the reverse happened: Canaan was used to punish Israel. After Joshua’s death, Israelites had turned away from God, which brought a lot of suffering and loss for them. When the people of Israel fell away from God and began to worship Baal among other gods, God had punished them. After many years of suffering, they finally turned back to God.

Deliverers came and overthrew the enemy, and had restored independence to Israel. Sadly, once peace was restored, people had gotten prideful and started living without God once again. We see the pattern repeated generation after generation, in which the enemy that wasn’t destroyed became a lot of trouble unto them. God had used the enemies around the Palestinian area to test the faithfulness of Israel, since it’s been unstable for years as well as the disobedience displayed by the Israelites. He used them also to give each new generation of Israelites an experience in combat.

Next, we find detailed a history of Israel’s foreign oppression and delivering of the judges. All of the oppression was detailed and who was delivered. In the Mesopotamian oppression, Othniel was delivered. In the Moabite oppression, Ehud was delivered. In the Philistine oppression, Shamgar was delivered. In the Canaanite oppression, Deborah-Barak was delivered. In the Midianite oppression, Gideon was delivered. Midway, we see the details of the hard times under Abimelech, Tola, and Jair.

After that, in the Ammonite oppression, Jephthah was delivered. Then, the minor judges were noted, and they were Ibzan, Elon, and Abdon. Next, we see in the Philistine oppression, Samson’s life was detailed, such as his birth and calling, his marriage to an unbeliever, his exploits, and his downfalls and restoration. After all of this, we see the illustrations of Israel’s spiritual, moral, and social chaos, such as idolatry, immorality, and tribal strife.

Now, going back to Gideon, he was a special one chosen by God that many take note. God chose Gideon, as we see in chapter 6, even though Gideon was unsure of His call at first. Gideon began a reformation of Israel in his homeland. Smashing the altar of Baal, its wooden pillar, and then building a new altar on which holy sacrifices are offered to Israel’s God were all ways that the reformation occurred. Men of the town were angry with Gideon, but when a fighting army was formed by Gideon to take down the Midianites, they supported Gideon. People of other tribes followed his example and then joined him. However, as soon as people prepared to fight, Gideon lacked faith in God – but God gracefully reassured him of his victory. Gideon gathered many men, but God urged Gideon to narrow them down to 300, which was small in Gideon’s eyes, but enough in God’s eyes, because He was talking about 300 great soldiers.

This would also show that the victory would be more by God’s power rather than mere military strength. After some insight from the Lord, Gideon knew the victory was imminent for them. Through all of the battling, God wanted deliverance. Gideon refused to rest until he’d killed the enemy kings. But even through doubts about Gideon, God still strengthened the men to do the work. Gideon pursued the two kings and captured them, and then killed them. After this, Gideon refused to take kingship, but when he died, the people slipped back into idolatry (worship of Baal). They forgot the God who delivered them.

In the closing thoughts of the book, the Israelites had a battle with the Benjaminites. This would bring Israel to rely on God for help, especially for planning attacks properly. Through the plan, everything worked out, because the men did as they were told and victory occurred. The children of Israel had departed, with every man going to his tribe and family, and there wasn’t a king in Israel, yet. People kept going back to their old ways of following their own will instead of God’s Will as well, which kept the cycle of problems going on and on for Israel.